European GMO-Free Regions Conference

16.01.2020 |

NGO letter
NGO letter

NGO letter to all MEPs: Call to support amendments on gene drive organisms in EP motion for a resolution on COP 15 CBD

Motion for a resolution on the 15th meeting of the Conference of Parties (COP15) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (B9-0035/2020); Please support amendments 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24

Dear Member of the European Parliament,

With this letter, we are asking you to support a call for a global moratorium on so-called Gene Drives as part of the European Parliament’s motion for a resolution on the 15th meeting of the

Conference of the Parties (COP15) to the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Biodiversity is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history. An estimate of 1 million species is threatened with extinction. This is the grim conclusion of the landmark report from the

Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES)

Gene Drives – a new eradication technology

08.01.2020 |

The Gene Drive Dilemma: We Can Alter Entire Species, but Should We?

FEATURE

A new genetic engineering technology could help eliminate malaria and stave off extinctions — if humanity decides to unleash it.

(.....)

What made the gene drive truly strange and remarkable, though, was that it didn’t stop with one set of offspring. Generation after generation, it would relentlessly copy and paste the gene it carried, until it was present in every descendant. “For most of the people in the room, you could tell it was the first they’d heard of this,” James recalled. “You could see their eyes getting big.”

21.12.2019 |

Here’s Why Many CRISPR/Cas9 Experiments Could Be Wrong – and How to Fix Them

Researchers assumed that CRISPR was turning off genes. They shouldn’t have.

Every living cell on Earth has proteins. Typically thousands of them, that serve as molecular machines to digest food, sense the environment, or anything else a cell must do. However, many genes, and the proteins they code for, have unknown functions. In humans, the function of about 1 out of 5 of genes is unknown. To explore these dark corners of the genome, scientists can break up DNA to disable a gene, making their encoded proteins nonfunctional, and watch what happens to cells as a result, inferring the lost function from what goes wrong.

When CRISPR/Cas9 came online in 2012, it offered scientists a tool to do exactly this – cut genes. The Cas9 enzyme searches through DNA, using a “guide RNA” to look for a specific sequence, and makes a cut when it finds a match. The gene, split in two, is repaired by the cell, but often with a large chunk missing. Many scientists assume that if a chunk of a gene is missing then the protein that it encodes will not function, or even be produced.

In many cases, they would be terribly wrong.

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Photo: © Sanjay Kumar

GMO-Free Europe, Berlin 2018

More than 200 participants from GMO Free Regions throughout Europe, as well as guests from North-America, Asia, New Zealand and Africa (35 nations in total) met in Berlin to discuss new an old challenges of genetic engineering in agriculture as well as the environment at large. They were relieved and reassured by the recent European Court of Justice’ decision that all forms of genetic engineering, including CRISPR-Cas and other forms of so called “gene editing” fall under the European directive on GMOs. This requires risk assessment and specific approval for each GM product, traceability and labelling. For further details and documentation see conference website.

GMO-Free Europe, Berlin 2015

From 6 to 8th May 2015 more than 400 representatives of regional governments, business, science and civil society from 60 countries and all continents met for the 8th conference and 10th anniversary of GMO Free Europe. For further details and documentation see conference website.

GMO-Free Europe
Brussels 2012

The 7th European GMO Free Regions Conference welcomed 200 participants from 33 countries inSeptember 2012 in Brussels. Key issues were the question of national bans for the cultivation of GMO crops. Sofia Gatica and Maria Godoy, two mothers from Argentina, called upon Europeans to stop the import of GM soybeans. Conference proceedings


GMO-Free Europe
Brussels 2010

300 people from 37 countries joined the 6th European Conference of GMO-Free Regions in Brussels and Ghent, 16-18 September 2010, including EU-Commissioner John Dalli, heads of supermarkets and leaders of the GMO Free movement inside and outside Europe.  Conference proceedings and audiovisuals

Food+Democracy
Lucern 2009

On 24/25th April 2009 the 5th European GMO Free Conference was hosted by the Swiss movement against GMOs in Lucern, including the Speaker of the National Council and the head of Parliament of the Canton Lucerne. They welcomed 250 representatives from 39 countries. Proceedings 


Planet Diversity
Bonn 2008

At the occasion of the UN Convention of Biological Diversity's meeting in Bonn, Germany, more than 700 representatives from 100 countries around the world gathered on April 12 to 16 in Bonn, Germany, to celebrate gmo-free agricultural diversity. A global festival, demonstration and 3 day conference with guests from all around the world marked the GMO Free Regions event 2008. Proceedings

GMO-Free Regions
Brussels 2007

300 participants from 37 countries gathered at the European Parliament in Brussels, 19-20 April 2007 to discuss strategies of the GMO free regions movement as well as burning issues such as the impacts of agro-fuels on sustainable agriculture. Proceedings

 

 

GMO-Free Regions
Berlin 2006

250 representatives of regional governments, municipalities, companies, farmers unions, consumer and environmental organisations and initiatives from 35 countries met in Berlin on January 14 - 15, 2006, for the 2nd GMO Free Regions conference.
Proceedings

GMO-FREE Europe, Berlin 2005

The First GMO Free Regions Conference took place in Berlin 22-23rd January 2005 in the Harnack house of the Max-Planck Society. 190 participants from 25 countries adopted the "Berlin Manifesto" of GMO Free Regions in Europe. More Details

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